ARTE EN ACCIÓN

gustos por los diferentes tipos y formas de hacer arte
centuriespast:

The Famous Mad Woman Who Begs at the Entrance to the Woods at Dornbach, near Vienna
Joseph Fischer, Austrian, 1769 - 1822

Geography:Made in Austria, Europe
Date:c. 1795

Medium:Etching
Philadelphia Museum of Art

centuriespast:

The Famous Mad Woman Who Begs at the Entrance to the Woods at Dornbach, near Vienna

Joseph Fischer, Austrian, 1769 - 1822

Geography:
Made in Austria, Europe
Date:
c. 1795 Medium:
Etching
Philadelphia Museum of Art

centuriespast:

An unusual mummy from the Roman Period
Name: Unknown
Sex: Male
Age at death: Adult (20 years + )
Estimated stature: 167 cm (5 feet 6 inches)
Pathological conditions: Severe tooth loss; numerous dental abscesses; tooth decay
Place of discovery: Thebes, Egypt
Date: Roman Period, after 30 BC
The British Museum

centuriespast:

An unusual mummy from the Roman Period

Name: Unknown

Sex: Male

Age at death: Adult (20 years + )

Estimated stature: 167 cm (5 feet 6 inches)

Pathological conditions: Severe tooth loss; numerous dental abscesses; tooth decay

Place of discovery: Thebes, Egypt

Date: Roman Period, after 30 BC

The British Museum

centuriespast:

The Flagellation of Christ, ca. 1630Alessandro Algardi, (Italian, 1598-1654) and François Du Quesnoy (Flemish, 1597-1643)Cast silver, silver gilt, lapis lazuli, agate, ebony, and agate
LUMA

centuriespast:

The Flagellation of Christ, ca. 1630
Alessandro Algardi, (Italian, 1598-1654) and François Du Quesnoy (Flemish, 1597-1643)
Cast silver, silver gilt, lapis lazuli, agate, ebony, and agate

LUMA

centuriespast:

jahsonic:My recent post of Goya’s Maja desnuda in which I referred to Cranach as the earliest depiction of pubic hair in art prompted several savvy responses by usual suspect Paul Rumsey.

I am especially greatful for pointing me to an article[1] by Alan Jacobs, author of Original Sin: a Cultural History with a relevant section on Adam and Eve in art.
The article features a collection of fig leaf images (illustration) covering Adam and Eve’s groins which on detailed inspection clearly show that Hubert and Jan van Eyck’s depiction of Eve[3] in a panel of the Ghent Altarpiece (ca. 1432) clearly shows that this is the earliest and at the same time fullest bush (left column, bottom) in Early Modern European art.
Legend:
Left column, from top to bottom:
Hugo van der Goes, The Fall of Man, ca. 1470.[2]
Lucas Cranach the Elder, Adam and Eve, ca. 1510.[3]
Peter Paul Rubens, Adam and Eve, 1599. [4]
Meister Bertram von Minden, The Grabow Altarpiece, ca. 1383.[5]
Peter Paul Rubens, Adam and Eve, 1599. [6]
Titian, Adam and Eve, ca. 1550.
Right column, from top to bottom:
Hans Baldung Grien, Adam and Eve, 1507.[7]
Hubert and Jan van Eyck, The Ghent Altarpiece, ca. 1432.[8]
Jan Gossaert, Adam and Eve, ca. 1520. [9]
Lucas Cranach the Elder, Adam and Eve, 1528.[10]
Hans Memling, Adam and Eve, ca. 1485. [11]
Hubert and Jan van Eyck, The Ghent Altarpiece, ca. 1432. [12]
Illustration via www.cabinetmagazine.org

centuriespast:

jahsonic:My recent post of Goya’s Maja desnuda in which I referred to Cranach as the earliest depiction of pubic hair in art prompted several savvy responses by usual suspect Paul Rumsey.

I am especially greatful for pointing me to an article[1] by Alan Jacobs, author of Original Sin: a Cultural History with a relevant section on Adam and Eve in art.

The article features a collection of fig leaf images (illustration) covering Adam and Eve’s groins which on detailed inspection clearly show that Hubert and Jan van Eyck’s depiction of Eve[3] in a panel of the Ghent Altarpiece (ca. 1432) clearly shows that this is the earliest and at the same time fullest bush (left column, bottom) in Early Modern European art.

Legend:

Left column, from top to bottom:

Right column, from top to bottom:

Illustration via www.cabinetmagazine.org